New Orleans Carjacking By Teens Results In Murder, DA To Try Suspects As Adults

Choices can have a lifelong impact. Such is the case of the four teens accused of murdering a 73-year-old grandmother, who was assaulted for her car and died from her injuries on March 21st last month.

The accused teens were identified as John Honore, 17; Lenyra Theophile, 15;  Mar’Qel Curtis, 15; and Briniyah Baker, 16. All four were indicted by a grand jury last week on second-degree murder charges according to the New Orleans Parish District Attorney’s Office and are being held on a $1 million bond.

Frickely’s employers’ video camera, located on the street where she parked her car, caught the whole assault and despicable act on film. In the video, released by her family, who is said to have wanted these events known, Frickley was leaving work around walking to her car around 1:00 p.m., in broad daylight, on a school day when she was attacked.

After getting into her car,17-year-old Honore can be seen on the video, pulling her car door open and repeatedly punching and kicking her. The other three girls are seen entering the passenger door and back seat areas.

The victim of an apparent fatal carjacking, Frickley was pulled from her vehicle, though her arm became trapped in her seatbelt while the contingent of three girls and one boy drove off dragging her alongside, causing her arm to detach from her torso. She died minutes later being pronounced dead at the scene. The Orleans Parish Coroner determined “blunt force trauma” was the cause of her death.

Neighbors came to her rescue offering aid and comfort in her final moments, as she lay dying awaiting emergency services. This was after they witnessed her arm severed from her body as she was dragged down their street.  One neighbor when interviewed by 4WWL News was quoted as saying on camera that “It was the most grotesque, horrific, and surreal thing I’ve ever seen…no regard for human life”.

Apparently, the parents of one of the youngest teens turned their daughter over to authorities, and the parent of Honore did the same. After officers located the male teen, the other two females were located and taken into custody.

At the request of District Attorney Jason Williams, the teens will be tried as adults on second-degree murder charges. Conviction on a second-degree murder charge carries a mandatory life sentence. Cases that involve murder, differ between juvenile and adult court, meaning the difference between a defendant staying in prison until age 21 versus a life sentence.

At a local press conference detailing his decision to seek to try them as adults DA Jason Williams said-

“There was a decision to encircle and prey on a woman that was clearly an elder, by all four individuals,”. “Then there was kicking and punching. All of the individuals got inside of the vehicle, which was a weapon in this case, and dragged her, despite her cries for help. And not a single one did anything to disengage or walk away.”

Williams further added,

“… I know that there are some in this community, who will absolutely say that I am wrong for charging these four young people as adults, while I say it was wrong of them to prey on and kill one of our elders,” and  “It is equally wrong to ignore the absurd state of affairs we are living now in the city of New Orleans,” and he also added “It is wrong that this city is collectively, utterly failing our children and consequently every citizen and every visitor to this city.”

He emphasized that these four teens should have been in school at the time of the incident and said truancy “is rampant” and “unaddressed” in the city. Williams was supposed to have met with the incoming superintendent and noted they would be working in partnership, addressing attendance issues. 

Sadly, information reported by News 4WWL-TV revealed that 17-year-old Honore’s criminal history notes that he was in juvenile court many times over the past several years, with at least seven prior arrests on more than 25 charges dating back to his first arrest at age 12. Charges include: armed robbery, possession of a firearm, auto theft, flight from an officer and in one case alone, 18 burglaries related to car break-ins. Now he adds carjacking and murder to the list.

What has happened to our youth that they could perpetrate such a heinous act on a senior? Where is their moral compass? Instead of helping her – they assaulted then drug her to her death for a short ride in her car which was left abandoned elsewhere. Where is the outrage for the failure of these teens to uphold the value of human life? How did they get hardened to such cruelty? Todays’ youth receive mixed messages that cost all of society.

America’s teens need to have a better example set for them by a society that doesn’t see life as something you can choose to lose because it’s inconvenient. As The Supreme Court currently looks at this issue, perhaps US citizens

should consider this example of the collateral human and moral damage that the current pro-choice laws have cost. America’s choices affect America’s youth. Linda Frickley paid a high price for these teens poor moral code. They will pay a high price for actively choosing to disregard her life.

Attorney General Williams spoke with Linda’s family and many of her friends, who painted the picture of a loving and selfless person. He characterized her in this way –

“Every single person to a fault has had nothing but glowing things to say about this phenomenal senior who was still actively working in our community and not scared to go in any neighborhood,”

May those who knew Linda Frickley be comforted in her life of caring service to the community and focused on the positive character she was said to demonstrate. Additionally, may AG Williams successfully prosecute this case.

America needs to work legislatively to correct the poor example it as set for decades now, additionally working to educate today’s youth in promoting focused service to others. Currently, these teens are not engaged in social responsibility, but rather are looking for the next thrill – at someone else’s expense.

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